Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

News: genetics

The Externalizing Consortium, an international research group co-founded by La Follette School Professor Philipp Koellinger, has identified 579 locations in the human genome associated with behaviors and disorders related to self-regulation, including addiction and child behavior problems.

Wednesday, October 14, 2020

New Faculty Focus: Sam Trejo

My research explores how social, environmental, and genetic factors combine to shape human development and the implications for public policy, using a wide range of quantitative tools, including quasi-experimental, computational, and biosocial methods.

Thursday, August 29, 2019

Welcome Lauren Schmitz

For most complex traits or behaviors like educational attainment, smoking, or body mass index, our genes are not are destiny; they are working through the environment around us, and in many cases, healthy environments are compensatory. As a result, salutary health and social policy can lift all boats, regardless of the DNA we were dealt.

La Follette School Professor Jason Fletcher will present Molecular Me: Implications of the Genomics Revolution on Thursday, April 18 in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. The 90-minute presentation at the Mead Public Library begins at 7 p.m.

La Follette School Professor Jason Fletcher will present Molecular Me: Exploring the Social Implications of the Genomics Revolution from 6:30 to 7:45 p.m. Thursday, March 7 at The University Club of Milwaukee, 924 E. Wells Street.

La Follette School Professor Jason Fletcher will present Molecular Me: Exploring the Social Implications of the Genomics Revolution on June 5 at the Wisconsin Alumni Association (WAA).

Thanks to technological advances, researchers know more about the human microbiome, a person’s genetic makeup, and the human brain than anyone could have imagined decades earlier. This knowledge brings with it great potential but also challenges for policy.

La Follette School Professor Jason Fletcher will give the next Crossroads of Ideas presentation at UW–Madison’s Discovery Building, 330 N. Orchard Street.

The Russell Sage Foundation awarded funding to La Follette School Professor Pam Herd and two colleagues from Stanford University for their research that analyzes newly available genomic data from a sample of older adults in the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. The researchers will examine the role of polygenic scores in influencing educational, occupational, and economic outcomes.

La Follette School Professor Jason Fletcher will discuss his pioneering research that explores the integration of sociology and genetics – sometimes called socio-genomics – in Green Bay on October 24 and in Madison on November 5.

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