Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

News: Students

A three-year program, the master of urban planning and public affairs double degree consists of 72 credits. Some students enter the program concurrently, while others add one degree after beginning the other.

La Follette School graduate student Nova Tebbe calls herself a climate newcomer. Yet, in early November, she joined 300 people who walked out of the United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (or COP26) to protest the lack of significant commitment to combat climate change.

Wednesday, November 24, 2021

Ian Pearson, MPA

"A La Follette School alumnus connected me with an internship at Madison College, where I worked on higher education policy challenges."

The La Follette School’s Undergraduate Certificate in Public Policy program and corresponding coursework equips students to continue their studies at the graduate level in technical skills and in-class climate.

The La Follette School’s new Certificate in Health Policy allows undergraduate students to gain critical knowledge and experience before entering the job market or graduate school.

Since 2016, the La Follette School has awarded the annual Stephen F. Brenton Health Policy Scholarship to a graduate student seeking to pursue a career in the health sector. Brenton is a widely respected leader who spent his career in health policy, and whose advocacy helped shape the healthcare landscape in Wisconsin and across the nation.

The La Follette School is seeking organizational partners to host student interns in its new Undergraduate Certificate in Health Policy.

Friday, September 17, 2021

Achievements featured in Highlights report

The 2020–2021 academic year gave the La Follette School many opportunities to celebrate, despite the many unprecedented challenges. The School welcomed 11 faculty members, honored 50 amazing master’s degree graduates, and grew its undergraduate course enrollment to more than 400 students.

This year, several projects for the Workshop course focused on issues related to equity and serving under-resourced communities. One group of students collaborated with Sixteenth Street Community Health Centers (SSCHC), a federally qualified community health center serving primarily low-income patients on the south side of Milwaukee. SSCHC has long recognized that socio-economic factors—such as income, education, employment, public safety, and housing—all contribute to quality and length of life.

Sixty-four students who received undergraduate degrees from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in May also earned a Certificate in Public Policy from the La Follette School of Public Affairs.

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