Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

Before entering the La Follette School, Emily Frank served as a legal advocate for people facing issues with their food stamps and public assistance in New York City.

Thursday, 01 October 2009 10:15

Newsletter features cost-benefit volume

A new book reviewing the application of cost-benefit analysis to social policy is part of a feature story in a summer 2009 MacArthur Foundation newsletter. La Follette School professor David Weimer and Aidan Vining of Simon Fraser University received a grant from the foundation to produce Investing in the Disadvantaged: Assessing the Benefits and Costs of Social Policies.

New York Times reporter Yamiche Alcindor frequently writes about inequality, race, and incarceration. Most recently, she has focused on the consequences of incarceration on the communities left behind as well as “the stereotypical way that we look at who’s to blame that these families are this way.”

Professor Pamela Herd appeared on Wisconsin Public Television's "Here and Now" in honor of Social Security's 75th anniversary.
A paper by public affairs professors Donald Moynihan and Pamela Herd has won the Wilder School Award for Scholarship in Social Equity and Public Policy Analysis.
Interconnected socioeconomic factors affect public health, 2012 alum Carly Hood notes in an opinion piece published last week by the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel.
La Follette School professor Maria Cancian looks at child support and complex families in Fast Focus, an Institute for Research on Poverty publication.

The opportunity to choose classes and explore possible career paths prompted Diana Rosales Mitte to change her study-abroad semester into a three-year stay — and then to pursue a Master of International Public Affairs.

Academic debate in the classroom wasn't quite enough, Lara Rosen found, a discovery that eventually led her to enroll at the La Follette School of Public Affairs to study social and urban policy at the state and local levels.

For Tim Smeeding, understanding the effects of public programs on poor people is paramount. "There are lots of confusing reports out there with inaccurate findings," says Smeeding, professor of public affairs and director of the Institute for Research on Poverty.

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