Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

News: Social Policy

Mental health shocks and homelessness is the topic of the La Follette School seminar on Tuesday, October 8, from 12:15-1:30 p.m. in 8417 Sewell Social Sciences.

Ann Drazkowski wants to do something about the extreme inequality and poverty she has seen. The first-year student brings to La Follette School a blend of domestic and international experience in social policy.

La Follette School sociologist Pamela Herd has received a $6.7 million grant from the National Institute on Aging to generate genetic research on participants in the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study.
Professor Pamela Herd discussed on Wisconsin Public Radio a new report on the financial state of Medicare and Social Security.

Empathy in action — caring about other people and acting to help them in some way — draws Lacee Koplin to public service. "I volunteered at my local food pantry a lot while I was growing up, and that got me interested in social issues in a hands-on sense, but I felt like there was so much more I could do," the public affairs student says.

Interconnected socioeconomic factors affect public health, 2012 alum Carly Hood notes in an opinion piece published last week by the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel.

For Austin Frerick, education is the best way to improve society and the best way democracy can achieve equality. "As a first-generation college student, education has empowered me, and I want to make sure that others have the same opportunity," the first-year student says.

Students Troy Hoppenjan and Ben Nerad will discuss their internships this summer at 12:30 p.m. on Wednesday, October 17, in the La Follette School conference room.

From Mali to Salt Lake City, La Follette School student Anne Chapman has seen the importance of well-informed, motivated community leadership — and the essential role a skilled analyst can play in sharing expertise about policy ramifications.

Curiosity about statistical methods brought Adam Hartung to the La Follette School. "I wanted to have a better understanding of how public policies are created and evaluated at a level higher than when I'm talking about a news story with friends," says the second-year Master of Public Affairs student.

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