Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs
Tuesday, 25 October 2016 08:08

2013 grad helping bridge science, policy

The interdisciplinary Neuroscience Training Program (NTP) drew C.P. Frost to the University of Wisconsin–Madison. The NTP’s joint graduate program with the La Follette School of Public Affairs – Neuroscience & Public Policy – sealed the deal.

Sunday, 15 June 2014 00:00

Barbara Wolfe

Richard A. Easterlin Professor of Economics, Population Health Sciences, and Public Affairs

Sunday, 15 June 2014 00:00

David L. Weimer

Edwin E. Witte Professor of Political Economy

A new book by La Follette School Professor Jason Fletcher and co-author Dalton Conley explores the latest discoveries being made at the scientific frontier where genomics and the social sciences intersect. The Genome Factor: What the Social Genomics Revolution Reveals about Ourselves, Our History & the Future is published by Princeton University Press.

La Follette School Professor Jason Fletcher discussed the social genomics revolution with co-author Dalton Conley during a Freakonomics’ podcast June 14. The episode – Evolution, Accelerated – focused on the advances in genetics and their societal implications.

Thursday, 12 June 2014 00:00

Gregory F. Nemet

Professor of Public Affairs 

Wednesday, 11 June 2014 00:00

Jason Fletcher

Professor of Public Affairs and Sociology
Director, Center for Demography and Aging
Director, WiscRDC

La Follette School faculty member Greg Nemet is one of only 35 recipients of the 2017 Andrew Carnegie fellowship. Nemet, an associate professor, will receive funding to support his research and writing on how a diverse set of policies and international-knowledge flows have led to inexpensive solar energy.

Associate Professor Manny Teodoro will join the La Follette School faculty in August with funding from the Kohl Initiative.

The cover story for the September 2 issue of Newsweek magazine features research by La Follette School Professor Barbara Wolfe and faculty affiliate Seth Pollak. Their report “Association of Child Poverty, Brain Development, and Academic Achievement” is cited as one of two studies that “cracked open a public conversation” on the influence of poverty on children’s learning and achievement.