Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs
Early detection of and intervention with Alzheimer's disease creates  net social benefits and Medicaid savings. La Follette School professor David Weimer will discuss this finding of a cost-benefit analysis at the Neuroscience and Public Policy Seminar on Friday, April 16, at 4 p.m. in Bardeen Medical Laboratories.

With most people confined to their homes due to the coronavirus pandemic, pets often provide much-needed relief from this surreal experience. Pet stores are even considered essential services, while most other businesses are shuttered. La Follette School Professor Dave Weimer and colleagues from the University of Oklahoma and Pennsylvania State University recently calculated the value of statistical dog life (VSDL). According to their article, Monetizing Bowser: A Contingent Valuation of the Statistical Value of Dog Life, U.S. households spend $70 billion annually on pets – with dogs the most common, suggesting that the VSDL might be substantial.

The Pioneer Institute selected La Follette School Professor Dave Weimer and Dr. Mark Sager as runners-up in its 2017 Better Government Competition. Weimer and Sager, an emeritus gerontologist at UW–Madison’s School of Medicine and Public Health, created a life-course model of Alzheimer’s patients to assess the costs and benefits to families and government of early detection.

The good news is that jobs, earnings and wages are rising again in Wisconsin as the economy slowly climbs back from the recession, the latest Wisconsin Poverty Report says.

Wisconsin is likely to see the most growth in available jobs in management and professional services to business, health care and social services, and leisure and recreation services into 2020, according to a report prepared for Competitive Wisconsin's BE BOLD 3 initiative by two La Follette School professors.

The latest Wisconsin poverty analysis using a state-specific poverty measure devised by University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers found mixed results in efforts to alleviate poverty and promote self-sufficiency in the state.

Upon his retirement this summer, professor John Witte will head to head for Astana and become dean of the new School for Humanities and Social Science at Nazarbayev University. UW-Madison recognized his teaching, research and service in April with the Hilldale Award.

The number of opioid-related deaths — from both prescription opioids and illegal drugs including heroin, fentanyl, and carfentanil — has quadrupled in the last 20 years. At present, the opioid epidemic claims 130 lives every day in the United States.

La Follette School Professor Bobbi Wolfe and Marguerite Burns of UW–Madison’s Department of Population Health Sciences received the Willard Manning Award in Mental Health Policy and Economics Research from the International Center of Mental Health Policy and Economics. 

Although many Americans don't think much about what's in their peanut butter, Susan Yackee, a leading scholar on the regulatory policymaking process at federal agencies, knows that the childhood favorite must contain at least 90 percent peanuts, as well as how that standard was established.
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