Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

More than 60 people attended each of four recent Town Hall meetings on key election issues with University of Wisconsin–Madison faculty members. The meetings in Appleton, Madison, Milwaukee, and suburban St. Paul, Minnesota, were sponsored by UW–Madison’s La Follette School of Public Affairs and Department of Political Science along with the Wisconsin Alumni Association.

Web streaming for the "Urban Men in Poverty: Problems and Solutions" symposium the La Follette School is hosting on Friday, April 24, in partnership with Marquette University Law School commences at 7:55 a.m. that day.

A group of researchers, including Tim Smeeding of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is proposing a universal monthly child allowance to eliminate extreme poverty among families with children in the United States.

A video and slides of public affairs professor Barbara Wolfe giving the Robert J. Lampman Memorial Lecture is available on the Institute for Research on Poverty's web site. She presented "Poverty and Poor Health: Can Health Care Reform Break the Link?" on June 21, 2011.

An interest in reducing structural inequality brings Demetri Vincze to public affairs and public service. "There is a fundamental inequality of opportunity in this country that is profoundly unjust," the first-year student says, "particularly in relation to race and poverty."

For someone wanting to know who is poor in the United States, Geoffrey Wallace is the guy to consult. The La Follette School economist has parsed various measures of U.S. poverty and finds that 15 percent of the U.S. population was poor in 2012.

Income inequality is on the rise, according to a national report card co-authored by La Follette School professor Timothy Smeeding, director of the Institute for Research on Poverty.

Dominique Williams' career plans did an about-face after she got to the La Follette School of Public Affairs. She expected to work as an attorney to advocate for underrepresented communities after she completed her dual degree in law and public affairs. "I originally thought I would be a practicing attorney and that my policy degree would be supplemental," she says.

The good news is that jobs, earnings and wages are rising again in Wisconsin as the economy slowly climbs back from the recession, the latest Wisconsin Poverty Report says.

The latest Wisconsin poverty analysis using a state-specific poverty measure devised by University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers found mixed results in efforts to alleviate poverty and promote self-sufficiency in the state.

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