Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs
Poverty may have direct implications for important, early steps in the development of the brain, saddling children of low-income families with slower rates of growth in two key brain structures, according to a La Follette School economist and other researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
Saturday, 01 September 2012 04:29

Poverty seminar series starts Thursday

Professors Tim Smeeding and Marcy Carlson will open the Institute for Research on Poverty's 2012-13 seminar series on Thursday, September 6, from 12:15-1:30 p.m. in 8417 Sewell Social Sciences.
Wednesday, 24 February 2010 07:05

Professor comments on Wisconsin poverty

Professor Tim Smeeding comments on poverty in Wisconsin in the Capital Times news web site, saying the state's increase in the overall poverty rate from 8.7 to 10.7 percent since 2000 is not a surprise.
Interconnected socioeconomic factors affect public health, 2012 alum Carly Hood notes in an opinion piece published last week by the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel.

The cover story for the September 2 issue of Newsweek magazine features research by La Follette School Professor Barbara Wolfe and faculty affiliate Seth Pollak. Their report “Association of Child Poverty, Brain Development, and Academic Achievement” is cited as one of two studies that “cracked open a public conversation” on the influence of poverty on children’s learning and achievement.

Research by economist Barbara Wolfe explores the association between socioeconomic status and the hippocampus, a brain region involved in learning and memory that is known to be affected by stress.

For Tim Smeeding, understanding the effects of public programs on poor people is paramount. "There are lots of confusing reports out there with inaccurate findings," says Smeeding, professor of public affairs and director of the Institute for Research on Poverty.

Even as poverty among Wisconsin children increased from 2010-11 due to declines in parents' incomes and safety net program cuts, fewer Wisconsin children lived in poverty in 2011 thanks to the state's safety net, a report by La Follette School professor Timothy Smeeding says.
Temporary increases in safety net programs and tax credits for working families helped keep many in Wisconsin from poverty during the recession and its aftermath, a new report by the University of Wisconsin–Madison finds.
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