Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

Joshua Cruz (MPA ’18), a student in the Neuroscience & Public Policy Program, is giving a presentation titled Poverty, Pregnancy, and Public Assistance Programs: A Neuroscience & Public Policy Perspective on Thursday, October 4.

Tuesday, 25 October 2016 08:08

2013 grad helping bridge science, policy

The interdisciplinary Neuroscience Training Program (NTP) drew C.P. Frost to the University of Wisconsin–Madison. The NTP’s joint graduate program with the La Follette School of Public Affairs – Neuroscience & Public Policy – sealed the deal.

Friday, 04 November 2016 08:11

Andrew Merluzzi, MPA

La Follette has incredible faculty who have provided me insight into the ways in which science can be changed – whether through economics, management, or incentive structures. Those are all possible levers to be pulled when thinking about policy change, and without the faculty and La Follette it’s hard to imagine understanding the true breadth of possible policy routes to take.

All of my La Follette coursework so far has been very useful for gaining a more complete understanding of the policy-making process and methods for analyzing and comparing policy options.

For C.P. Frost, evil is not an absolute. As a neuroscientist, he understands that a quirk in a person's brain may lead to what society deems criminal behavior.

Recent alum CP Frost discusses in a Scientific American blog the tension that can exist between politicians and scholars who seek government funding for research.

Monday, 22 October 2018 10:49

Marisa Ross (MPA, PhD)

Even as an out-of-state student, I was aware of the La Follette School’s glowing reputation and the high quality of public administration research conducted here, so I was particularly interested in learning from some true experts.

Because Andrew Merluzzi did not want to find himself trapped in career rut, he thought the University of Wisconsin–Madison's dual-degree program in public affairs and neuroscience would be a good option.

The University of Wisconsin–Madison’s Neuroscience and Public Policy Program has been honored as this year's top graduate program in neuroscience in the country.

The Neuroscience and Public Policy Program at the University of Wisconsin–Madison is described in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. The article features second-year student Kimberly Farbota and Lindsay Pascal, who received her master of public affairs and is working on her doctorate in neuroscience.
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