Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

News: Management

Dominique Williams' career plans did an about-face after she got to the La Follette School of Public Affairs. She expected to work as an attorney to advocate for underrepresented communities after she completed her dual degree in law and public affairs. "I originally thought I would be a practicing attorney and that my policy degree would be supplemental," she says.

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Mideast expert to discuss Egypt

Alum Katie Croake, program manager with the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs, will discuss recent events in Egypt in a presentation Tuesday, March 29, noon to 1 p.m. in the La Follette School conference room.
Federal health-care reform, poverty in Wisconsin, and voting procedures are topics explored in the spring 2011 La Follette Policy Report just released by the La Follette School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

2009 alum Alison Patz came to the La Follette School knowing she wanted to work for the federal government in international public affairs.

La Follette School faculty share their expertise on voting, Wisconsin politics and economics, and the Great Recession.

Wherever life takes Erika Jones, she intends to always be involved in public service. Her training and experiences through the La Follette School are helping her advance her career interests in fostering stronger communities and public policy that supports sustainable agriculture.

Associate  director Donald Moynihan has been elected to the Policy Council of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management.
Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Public managers to speak with students

Students will learn tricks of the trade from senior managers participating in a panel discussion organized by public management professors Donald Moynihan and Susan Yackee.
Although many Americans don't think much about what's in their peanut butter, Susan Yackee, a leading scholar on the regulatory policymaking process at federal agencies, knows that the childhood favorite must contain at least 90 percent peanuts, as well as how that standard was established.
Participants in the state's premier women's leadership seminar this year will get a special one-on-one speed mentoring workshop.
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