Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs
Friday, 21 March 2014 00:00

Maxim helps countries fight pandemics

Alum Corina Maxim's job as a program officer with the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is a study in contrasts.

Tahira Chaudary is investing in her own education with an eye toward someday helping people in Pakistan develop their own human capital.

Tuesday, 22 October 2013 00:00

Toniolo helps strengthen communities

Maria Toniolo is broadening her expertise in international trade, finance and economic development through the La Follette School's Master of International Public Affairs degree program.

2010 Master of International Public Affairs alum Farha Tahir met with students to discuss careers, informational interviews and other job search strategies.
Based on the number of business cards swapped, hands shaken and questions asked, the first "La Follette in D.C." program was an outstanding success in bringing students to the U.S. capital to meet alumni and employers.

Working with immigrant children in two countries showed Katie Lorenze that too often politicians pass legislation focused on broad, vague ideas and without thought for the often unintended consequences. "In Spain and the United States, I saw how bad public policy affects children and families every day," the second-year La Follette School student says.

The opportunities to learn quantitative skills in an international context and to study Thai brought Ryan Hohler to the La Follette School of Public Affairs.

Amanda Wilmarth wants to improve U.S. relations with China and ease tensions on the Korean Peninsula, so 10 years after completing her bachelor's degree in international relations and East Asian studies, she is back at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, pursuing a Master of International Public Affairs degree.

On September 11, 2001, Matthew Mayeshiba was a freshman planning to study viola at the University of Minnesota.  But by 2005, with the invasion of Iraq and the presidential election, "there seemed to be so many more important things in the world," says Mayeshiba, who joined the military in 2006 and later enrolled at the La Follette School.

A nongovernmental organization offering development assistance in northern Rwanda and southwestern Uganda has some new ideas for how to expand its services, thanks to recommendations from a group of La Follette School students.

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