Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

News: Health

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Herd explores influences on aging

Professor Pamela Herd is always thinking about long-term implications, even when she works on a research project on pregnancy.

Partners in a spousal relationship share a greater degree of genetic similarity than do randomly selected, non-coupled pairs of individuals, according to a new study co-authored by La Follette School professor Jason Fletcher.

Understanding the long-term impacts of public policy in Wisconsin and across the United States are at the top of Jason Fletcher's research agenda.

Genetics play a role in whether stress makes people depressed and in how quickly they recover, new research on the effects of the 9/11 terrorist bombing finds.

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Weimer, Yackee named faculty fellows

David Weimer and Susan Yackee are the first two Daniel Louis and Genevieve Rustvold Goldy Faculty Fellows.

No one knows better than 2000 alum Beth Kohler how busy the world of Medicaid is.

Thanks in part to a La Follette School cost-benefit analysis, children and adolescents in Wisconsin's Fox River Valley have access to school-based mental health services.

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Coleman advances women's health

Michele Coleman wants to know why people make the decisions they do about their health to help them lead healthier lives.  To that end, the public affairs and public health dual-degree candidate is presenting a paper about the influence of religion on the abortion decision-making process and experience at a national conference.
La Follette School professor Jason M. Fletcher has won the 2013-2014 prize for the Best Research in Health & Society from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholars program at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
Wisconsin state agencies spend substantial amounts of money to procure food for hospitals, prisons and other facilities. Curious about how nutritional guidelines could improve the diet and therefore the health of people served by these state agencies and of agency employees, Health First Wisconsin turned to the La Follette School.
Page 9 of 22