Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

News: Finance

Most retirees are unlikely to experience adverse health shocks early in their retirement, but racial minorities, people with low levels of education, and people who retired on Social Security Disability Insurance are at substantial risk for shocks to physical and cognitive health, four professors report in the fall La Follette Policy Report.
A project for the public affairs course 819 Advanced Quantitative Methods for Public Policy is the basis of an article written by a student and an alum that appears this month in an academic journal.
Thursday, September 29, 2011

Economist Reschovsky to receive national honor

Economist Andrew Reschovsky will be honored in November with the 2011 Steve Gold Award, which recognizes a person who has made a significant contribution to public financial management in the field of intergovernmental relations and state and local finance.

The U.S. tax code is an important tool to address social policy problems, Katherine Sydor came to realize during her first year as a student at the La Follette School of Public Affairs.

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

Students to discuss internships Wednesday

Three La Follette School students will talk about their internship experiences in an informal lunchtime session on Wednesday, September 7, at noon in the La Follette School conference room.

Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Chinn offers insight on nation's debt

In a New York Times op-ed, professor Menzie Chinn offers his take on the downgrading of America's credit rating --and what is at stake if it stays that way.
La Follette School faculty have been sharing their insights in the media.
Public affairs professor Karen Holden advised Sesame Street on its new Sesame Street financial education initiative "For Me, for You, for Later: First Steps to Spending, Sharing, and Saving."
Despite a majority of Wisconsin school districts losing substantial amounts of state aid, most districts will be forced to reduce school property taxes under Governor Scott Walker's proposed budget, unless voters agree to raise revenue limits, a new study finds.
Large cities in the United States are likely to reduce their per-capita spending by 7 percent from 2009 to 2013 due to the impact of the recession and the housing crisis, a forecast by a La Follette School of Public Affairs economist and his co-authors suggests.
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