Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs
More than 50 alumni, friends of the La Follette School and faculty renewed their friendships and ties to their alma mater at the school's reception in Washington, D.C., on November 4.
More than 50 alumni, friends, and incoming and continuing students are invited to join faculty and staff at the La Follette School's summer picnic today, July 11, from 5-7 p.m. on the school's grounds.

Steve Kulig (MPA ’14) returned to his alma mater as the La Follette School’s new career services coordinator and department administrator in April. As career services coordinator, Kulig helps students devise job-search strategies, manages alumni job placement data, and maintains the School’s network of potential employers, including those appropriate for internships.

The suspicion that the federal Affordable Care Act reduces options for patients to choose their health-care providers proves to be true, according to a new study co-authored by La Follette School professor David Weimer. However, the quality of hospitals in insurance exchange networks was as good or better than those in commercial insurance networks.

Wednesday, 28 March 2012 00:00

Analysis course benefits state of Wisconsin

Public affairs students in David Weimer's cost-benefit analysis class are helping state agencies and community organizations make better decisions about criminal justice reform, environmental regulations, child welfare, mental health treatment and other policy areas.

Friday, 22 February 2013 05:04

Analysis debunks currency policy tenet

The argument that more flexibility in the exchange rate regime speeds up current account adjustment is not true, recent analysis by economist Menzie Chinn suggests.
Large cities in the United States are likely to reduce their per-capita spending by 7 percent from 2009 to 2013 due to the impact of the recession and the housing crisis, a forecast by a La Follette School of Public Affairs economist and his co-authors suggests.
A new analysis by suggests that school districts could see an aggregate 7 percent reduction in allowable revenues relative to the 2010-11 revenue limit — if the Wisconsin governor's budget includes a mandated reduction of $500 per pupil in the sum of general aid received from the state and local property tax revenue.

Researchers studying the economic and policy forces that affect Wisconsin poverty released their latest results, which show that although employment rose by almost 60,000 jobs in the state, there was no reduction in poverty. Instead, poverty remained unchanged from 2013 to 2014 at 10.8 percent.

Researchers studying the economic and policy forces that affect Wisconsin poverty have released their latest results, which show that although the state economy is creating jobs, the poverty rate rose from 10.2 to 10.9 percent in 2013 using the researchers' expanded measure.

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