Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

News: Communication

Former La Follette School publications director Alice Honeywell and her friend Bobbi Montgomery invite readers to follow their ride by bicycle across the United State.

Fifteen months after she completed her capstone workshop report at the La Follette School, Gail Krumenauer found herself sitting with three other economists figuring out why the state of Oregon's per-capita personal income was declining compared to the rest of the United States.

Wisconsin has increased public access to outdoor recreational opportunities thanks in part to Erin (Rushmer) Probst's work with the Department of Natural Resource's stewardship program.

Alum Saul Wolf connects quality, low-cost money transfer firms to credit unions, financial  cooperatives and other micro-finance entities as remittances manager at the World Council of Credit Unions.

2009 alum Alison Patz came to the La Follette School knowing she wanted to work for the federal government in international public affairs.

La Follette School professors are sharing their expertise with media about the budget proposals and protests in Wisconsin.
La Follette School faculty share their expertise on voting, Wisconsin politics and economics, and the Great Recession.

The process of engaging people is far more important than the end result, believes Colin Christopher, a first-year international public affairs student.

Professor Pamela Herd's finding that good grades in high school are linked to good health later in life has been drawing lots of media attention since it was released.

The past holds the secrets of good leadership. Alum Jeff Appelquist believes this tenet so fervently he has built a business on it: Blue Knight History Seminars, LLC, a company that offers leadership and team development training centered on visits to great American battlefields.

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