Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

News: Children

The effects of poverty on brain development will be discussed in a La Follette School seminar on Tuesday, April 8, at noon in the school conference room.
The mental health effects of unwanted births will be discussed by sociologist Pamela Herd at the La Follette School seminar at noon, Tuesday, April 1, in the school conference room.
La Follette School students gathered February 28 to make 15 blankets for the Madison area chapter of Project Linus.
Research on the impacts of childhood neighborhoods and broader environments on adult health outcomes will be discussed at a seminar on Tuesday, March 25, from 12:15-1:30 p.m. in 8417 Sewell Social Sciences Building.
President Barack Obama has nominated La Follette School professor Maria Cancian for assistant secretary for children and families (family support) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Alum Tamarine Cornelius wants to people to have the information they need to make up their own minds about state budget issues and to help them connect the dots between budget issues.

La Follette School alum Tamarine Cornelius of the Wisconsin Council on Children and Families will be the first speaker for the spring Policy and a Pint from 5-7 p.m. on Thursday, February 20, at Brocach, 7 West Main Street.

For Scott Wood, graduate school has been about opportunities — and making the most of them. In doing so, the second-year La Follette School student has become an expert on Wisconsin's economy and employment prospects, and on domestic violence conviction rates in Milwaukee.

Poverty may have direct implications for important, early steps in the development of the brain, saddling children of low-income families with slower rates of growth in two key brain structures, according to a La Follette School economist and other researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
Improving nutrition and physical activity in child-care settings may be one of the best tools the state of Wisconsin could use to reduce the prevalence of childhood obesity, which affects 14 percent of preschoolers and 9 percent of adolescents in the state.
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