Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

News: Students

Reflecting on her own journey, Katherine Gehl challenged the La Follette School of Public Affairs’ Class of 2017 to take on challenges big enough that the possibility of failure is real and present.

Graduating students at the La Follette School of Public Affairs addressed household financial management, educational approaches for disadvantaged children, economic development strategies, and other challenging issues through the school’s capstone courses.

La Follette School students have numerous opportunities to apply their coursework as project assistants (PAs) on and off campus. Employers gain highly skilled employees, and students use their training in real-world work environments.

Even modest increases in the net worth of those who save the least for retirement would greatly improve retirement readiness and reduce government spending on public assistance programs, according to research conducted by La Follette School faculty member J. Michael Collins and three graduate students on behalf of AARP Wisconsin.

The La Follette School of Public Affairs’ first summer public policy course will examine inequalities across various social dimensions with a focus on disparities among racial and ethnic groups.

The La Follette School’s annual Visit Day drew 43 prospective students from 14 states and Washington, D.C., to the UW–Madison campus Monday, March 27. Current students, alumni, and faculty members answered a wide range of questions during panel discussions and lunch at Union South.

After a hard-fought battle – including a tie-breaker question – the Elder Belles won the La Follette School Student Association’s (LSSA) first Trivia Night, which raised more than $700 for their graduation celebration and other projects.

There is no policy school in the Midwest that offers more rigorous quantitative classes than the La Follette School. 

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