Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

News: Science

A new book by La Follette School Professor Jason Fletcher and co-author Dalton Conley explores the latest discoveries being made at the scientific frontier where genomics and the social sciences intersect. The Genome Factor: What the Social Genomics Revolution Reveals about Ourselves, Our History & the Future is published by Princeton University Press.

La Follette School student Andrew Merluzzi has been selected for the 2017 Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship Program sponsored by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

November 7, 2016

Andrew Merluzzi, MPA

La Follette has incredible faculty who have provided me insight into the ways in which science can be changed – whether through economics, management, or incentive structures. Those are all possible levers to be pulled when thinking about policy change, and without the faculty and La Follette it’s hard to imagine understanding the true breadth of possible policy routes to take.

A study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics reveals for the first time the mechanism behind the relationship between childhood poverty and doing poorly in school.

Garrett Johnson is looking for a few more hunters. The first-year public affairs student holds a project assistantship with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, working on a project involving public education and recruitment for hunting.

How the brain reflects parents' socioeconomic status and the consequences for schooling attainment is the subject of a talk on Thursday, October 9, by La Follette School economist Barbara Wolfe at 12:15 p.m. in 8417 Sewell Social Sciences.

The Great Recession continues to wreak havoc on city budgets long after it officially ended, depriving many of the nation's largest central cites of tax revenue even as the economy recovers, according to a new data analysis by La Follette School economist Andrew Reschovsky and other researchers at the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy. Read the news release

Poverty may have direct implications for important, early steps in the development of the brain, saddling children of low-income families with slower rates of growth in two key brain structures, according to a La Follette School economist and other researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
First-year student Princess Ojiaku shares her impression of the La Follette School and the University of Wisconsin–Madison in her Scientific American blog, Science with Moxie: Musical Notes on Neuroscience.
La Follette School students are volunteering together at the Wisconsin Science Festival at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery on the evening of Friday, September 28.
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