Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

News: Neuroscience

La Follette School student Andrew Merluzzi has been selected for the 2017 Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship Program sponsored by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

November 7, 2016

Andrew Merluzzi, MPA

La Follette has incredible faculty who have provided me insight into the ways in which science can be changed – whether through economics, management, or incentive structures. Those are all possible levers to be pulled when thinking about policy change, and without the faculty and La Follette it’s hard to imagine understanding the true breadth of possible policy routes to take.

The interdisciplinary Neuroscience Training Program (NTP) drew C.P. Frost to the University of Wisconsin–Madison. The NTP’s joint graduate program with the La Follette School of Public Affairs – Neuroscience & Public Policy – sealed the deal.

Mother Nature saved some of the summer’s best weather for the La Follette School’s annual Hill Fest celebration. Atop Observatory Hill and under blue skies, more than 120 students, alumni, friends, faculty, and staff marked the start of the 2016–17 academic year with a picnic dinner and enthusiastic conversations.

The cover story for the September 2 issue of Newsweek magazine features research by La Follette School Professor Barbara Wolfe and faculty affiliate Seth Pollak. Their report “Association of Child Poverty, Brain Development, and Academic Achievement” is cited as one of two studies that “cracked open a public conversation” on the influence of poverty on children’s learning and achievement.

Because Andrew Merluzzi did not want to find himself trapped in career rut, he thought the University of Wisconsin–Madison's dual-degree program in public affairs and neuroscience would be a good option.

The University of Wisconsin–Madison’s Neuroscience and Public Policy Program has been honored as this year's top graduate program in neuroscience in the country.

Spurred by her desire to help people and translate scientific findings into better health policy, Annie Racine came to the University of Wisconsin–Madison, the only U.S. campus to offer a dual degree in public policy and neuroscience.

Recent alum CP Frost discusses in a Scientific American blog the tension that can exist between politicians and scholars who seek government funding for research.

First-year student Princess Ojiaku shares her impression of the La Follette School and the University of Wisconsin–Madison in her Scientific American blog, Science with Moxie: Musical Notes on Neuroscience.
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