Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

News: Housing

November 21, 2017

Eric Hepler, MPA

During my undergraduate studies, I worked at a municipal consulting firm (Center for Government Research), that worked with local communities to improve government services. I enjoyed the work as well as knowing that we were improving people’s lives. I determined that a public affairs degree would give me the skills that I’d need to pursue that line of work as a career.

November 23, 2016

Elizabeth Doyle, MPA

The networking opportunities and feedback regarding professional development provided by the school have been particularly helpful in defining my career goals and supporting my career search.

2000 alum Carole Schaeffer comments in an InBusiness discussion about multifamily housing development and the boom in luxury apartments in Madison. She is director of Smart Growth Greater Madison, and president of her own consulting firm.

A belief in the power of policymakers to create public policy that helps people led Ellen Hildebrand to a career in urban planning and housing policy.

An interest in reducing structural inequality brings Demetri Vincze to public affairs and public service. "There is a fundamental inequality of opportunity in this country that is profoundly unjust," the first-year student says, "particularly in relation to race and poverty."

Two dozen La Follette School students descended on Chicago November 6 for a whirlwind career exploration visit, the second such event sponsored by the school in the past year.

Twenty-nine La Follette School students are going to Chicago on Thursday, November 6, for a career development visit that culminates with an alumni reception from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce in the Wrigley Building, Suite 900, 410 N. Michigan Avenue.

Kristine Giornalista knows she is never going to know everything required to do her job. Rather, the 2004 alum knows she has to pick the right team and ask the right questions.

When 2007 alum Deven Carlson was applying to graduate schools, he knew he wanted to be involved in public policy debates, but he wasn’t quite sure about how he wanted to go about that.

Professor Barbara Wolfe wants to know why people act the way they do and how society might help them make better choices.

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