Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

News: Health

Sarah Kliff, one of the country’s leading health policy journalists, will share her insights on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and what repeal of the law will mean for millions of people who rely on it for health insurance coverage at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, November 29 at the La Follette School of Public Affairs.

Health economist Katherine Baicker will give the 2017 Paul Offner Lecture on Tuesday, November 28 at the Pyle Center, 702 Langdon Street. Her presentation, The Effect of Medicaid Spending, Health, and Well-Being: Evidence and Implications for Reform, begins at 4:30 p.m.

The Evidence-Based Health Policy Project (EBHPP) at the University of Wisconsin–Madison is sponsoring a public discussion about community health on Friday, September 8 at UW–Fox Valley. State Representatives Dave Murphy, Mike Rohrkaste, and Amanda Stuck are hosting the event, which features six local groups working to improve health in the region.

As someone who hires many different policy and budgeting positions for the state, we look for applicants that have the skills taught at La Follette.

The Pioneer Institute selected La Follette School Professor Dave Weimer and Dr. Mark Sager as runners-up in its 2017 Better Government Competition. Weimer and Sager, an emeritus gerontologist at UW–Madison’s School of Medicine and Public Health, created a life-course model of Alzheimer’s patients to assess the costs and benefits to families and government of early detection.

John Vander Meer (MPA ’06) participated in a panel discussion about the implications of Wisconsin’s aging population and growing long-term care workforce crisis for state policy May 2 in Madison.

La Follette School Professor Pam Herd is a co-principal investigator on a project selected for a UW2020: WARF Discovery Initiative award. Professor Cameron Currie of the Department of Bacteriology is the principal investigator for project, The Human Microbiome in Health and Disease.

La Follette School Professor Bobbi Wolfe and Marguerite Burns of UW–Madison’s Department of Population Health Sciences received the Willard Manning Award in Mental Health Policy and Economics Research from the International Center of Mental Health Policy and Economics. 

Taking the quantitative analysis coursework – both semesters of statistics and cost-benefit analysis – was key in helping me be prepared for state budget work immediately after graduation.

There is no policy school in the Midwest that offers more rigorous quantitative classes than the La Follette School. 

Page 1 of 19