Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs

News: Energy

A study by La Follette School Associate Professor Greg Nemet and European colleagues shows that in 2050, the percentage of solar energy worldwide could be three times higher than previously projected. The study by the Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC) shows that costs have dropped and infrastructures expanded much faster than even the most optimistic models had assumed.

University of Wisconsin–Madison Chancellor and La Follette School faculty member Rebecca Blank has been named co-chair of the Council on Competitiveness’ Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Partnership (EMCP).

La Follette School faculty member Greg Nemet is one of only 35 recipients of the 2017 Andrew Carnegie fellowship. Nemet, an associate professor, will receive funding to support his research and writing on how a diverse set of policies and international-knowledge flows have led to inexpensive solar energy.

The La Follette School of Public Affairs is co-sponsoring the public presentation Deescalating the Energy Wars at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, October 26. Tisha Schuller, strategic advisor to the Stanford Natural Gas Initiative, will tell her story of moving from environmental activist to energy champion.

The Wisconsin K-12 Energy Education Program (KEEP) honored La Follette School of Public Affairs faculty member Gregory Nemet with its 2016 Higher Education Energy Educator of the Year Award.

La Follette School student Nate Miller is developing the skillset he needs to help government maximize its effectiveness for its citizens.

Nick Lardinois’ love of nature and numbers led him to the La Follette School of Public Affairs.

The City of Madison has new ideas from La Follette School students to help the city achieve the carbon and energy goals laid out in its sustainability plan.

After years of lab work, Debaki Ale was ready to become more directly involved in energy and environmental policy, so she enrolled in the La Follette School's Master of International Public Affairs degree and its energy analysis and policy certificate programs.

The costs of installing a residential solar energy system seem to vary by the amount of competition in a market, the type of installer and by geographical area, new research suggests.

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